What Does A Master Sommelier Drink With Local Foods?

$640.00 excl. GST

Ever wondered what one of the world’s leading sommeliers drinks to accompany some of Singapore’s go-to dishes?

Fish Sauce Fried Rice

  • Vie de Romans Ciampagnis Vieris | Chardonnay
  • Mark Angeli La Lune | Chenin Blanc

Pork and Prawn Dumplings

  • Pauline Collin-Bérêche Ludes Vieilles Vignes | Champagne (100% Pinot Noir)
  • Mukai Shuzō Natsu No Omoide | Sake (Gohyakumangoku)

Shredded Duck Popiah 

  • Kistler | Pinot Noir
  • Clos Cibonne Cuvée Caroline | Rosé (Tibouren blend)

Mark Angeli La Lune Chenin Blanc

What — Chenin Blanc
Where — Loire Valley, France
When — 2020

Rich, textural expression with an array of bruised green apples, ripe stone fruits and an incredibly long and complex finish.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “This is a bit of a trickier dish to match. Having the elements of sweetness to balance in savoury dishes isn’t all too easy, but I find that wines with a touch of funk can work well—and La Lune works perfectly. It has a piercing acidity which helps cut through the oily character, and the inherent touch of cheesy funk from Chenin is a great complement to the oily, savoury nature of the dish. A little lick of residual sugar in the wine adds texture beyond just sweetness and balances the dish.

I’ve been a long-time fan of Mark Angeli; he is one of the godfathers of biodynamics and natural wine in the Loire. He’s known to push the limits and has done so despite the battle of less pedigreed vineyards seen with other top-flight producers. I really love Chenin Blanc—it’s such a chameleon of a variety. It has an amazing ability to adapt and be reflective of both place and winemaking, with a beautiful balance of flavour, funk, sugar and incredible ageing potential.”

A chemistry student turned stonemason, Mark Angeli fell in love with the world of wine and moved to Anjou, in the Loire Valley, in 1999. He stumbled upon La Ferme de la Sansonnière, a historic polycultural property, which was for sale and jumped at the opportunity—converting the property to biodynamic farming, which was quite revolutionary at the time. He faced severe opposition, including being refused AOC designations in the labelling of his wines. So in 2007, he stopped claiming any local appellations altogether and labelled them under Vin de France instead.

La Lune is 100% Chenin from different parcels within La Ferme de la Sansonnière, totalling around 3 hectares and making up roughly half of Angeli’s production. It’s made in a fairly dry style, but retains a balance of residual sugar against its vibrant acidity. The wine is fermented in old, large format barrels and spends 12 months ageing before bottling. As a testament to his work and continued drive, Angeli has converted the use of sulphur to volcanic sulphur—which isn’t a petrochemical byproduct. He believes that using this instead of conventional sulphur allows him to interfere less, while still achieving a stable wine.

A true benchmark for Chenin grown on schist, from a vigneron that has been responsible for the growth and development of so many within the Loire.

In stock

Vie de Romans Ciampagnis Vieris Chardonnay

What — Chardonnay
Where — Friuli, Italy
When — 2019

Textural richness balanced with fresh citrus notes, green apple tang, light notes of honey and a lingering acidity.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “I wanted to contrast the approach used with the La Lune Chenin (which was about the bit of funk and vibrant acidity) with a focus on textural richness and well-integrated oak. It provides a balance to the oily nature of the dish, with the oak elements lending a savoury edge to the wine.

This is really a polished, and age-worthy example of the style; it certainly sits amongst the top flight of Chardonnay globally. I’ve not visited the winery as of yet—but it’s certainly on my bucket list. I’ve been a long-time fan of their wines. I remember first experiencing their wines when working at Rockpool in Sydney, through their Pinot Grigio. At the time, I didn’t know it was a skin-contact style and when it poured, this amber colour was certainly a surprise for both me and the guest! Thankfully they loved the wine!”

Since its founding in 1900, Vie de Romans has remained in the hands of the Gallo family (different from the family behind American powerhouse, E&J Gallo), with Gianfranco Gallo leading the estate since 1978. Their work sees extensive time in the vines, with an astonishing 700 hours per hectare of vineyard work. They focus on wines of texture, tension and structure—with an array of wines produced in various styles.

Vie de Romans draws their Chardonnay from the vineyard, Ciampagnis Vieris, known for its shallow, well-drained soils with a gravel-pebbly texture and reddish clay hue. Following quite a traditional elevage, it sees approximately 8 months of barrel ageing on lees without malolactic, before further bottle time prior to release. While it is approachable and young, the wine has a long life ahead and really shines with aeration and time in a decanter, especially if it’s served early (and not too chilled).

 

In stock

Pauline Collin-Bérêche Ludes Vieilles Vignes

What — Champagne (100% Pinot Noir)
Where — Champagne, France
When — 2016

Rich and dark fruited with a brilliant acidity cutting through to a long finish.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “Two loves of mine—Champagne and dumplings! These dumplings are loaded with flavour, so they could use a richer style of Champagne to balance them with the acidity cutting through. The slight nutty touch of oxidative character you see with Pauline’s wine nicely counters the light sweetness in the dish.

I’ve been a long-time fan of Raphaël’s wines at Bérêche et Fils; you will always find a bottle or two of their Brut Reserve in my fridge. Her first release is a great way to start things off and it really over-delivers. Super exciting to see a new producer come to the front, with such pedigree and quality to match.”

Pauline Bérêche has taken over her family’s estate and is really beginning to bring it out of the shadows. Blessed with a suite of old vines in the village of Ludes, she has released the first wine under her eponymous label. Pauline has converted the vineyards to organic farming, allowing natural grasses to grow throughout. Her release is 100% Pinot Noir that has spent 48 months on lees before disgorgement and has a dosage of 3.5g/L. Just 1,996 bottles were produced for her 2016 vintage.

Pauline is the wife of Raphaël Bérêche (of Bérêche et Fils) and if her inaugural release is a sign of her potential, then she is going to be a worthy challenger to her husband in the future as a leading producer amongst the Montagne de Reims.

 

In stock

Mukai Shuzō Natsu No Omoide

What — Sake (100% Gohyakumangoku)
Where — Kyōto, Japan
When — 2000

Amazing freshness for its age, with a balanced touch of sweetness through a complexity of flavours and bright acidity.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “Personally, I love sake. I find myself drawn towards the ‘weird and wacky’, where flavour and some funk is central—the antithesis to the purity that most associate with sake. The dish has a nutty character, some sweetness and a savoury finish: very much complementary flavours to aged sake, particularly the Natsu No Omoide which was brewed in 2000 with a yeast strain that’s 1,000 years old. The sake has a touch of sweetness, with a refreshing acidity. This really pushes the boundaries on most people’s definition of sake. It’s a great conduit between natural wine lovers and the world of sake.

It’s not everyday that you see a 20-year-old sake. I’m a huge fan of the producer, who is one of the first female Master Brewers in Japan—when she was just in her early 20s! Their sakes are very much about complexity, balance and versatility. Not many sake can be two decades old and still going as strong, fresh and vibrant as this.”

Mukai Shuzō is an ancient brewery that has maintained its familial tradition and practice since 1754. The owner’s eldest daughter, Kuniko Mukai, became one of the first female Master Brewers in Japan at 22, and her ascension to Toji marks nearly 275 years of continual family lineage.

Production remains small, with a constant drive to challenge and improve things. Kuniko’s quest for quality has led to a demand amongst sake aficionados that far outweighs production.

Natsu no Omoide (meaning ‘Memories of Summer’) was brewed for the turn of the millennium and is one of Kuniko’s first brews as head brewer. It uses Gohyakumangoku rice polished to 70% and a unique 100-year-old yeast strain. Most sake would be well and truly dead at 20 years of age, but this one demonstrates a complex blend of nutty, woody, floral and a strong backbone of acidity. Truly, one to sip and savour as it unfolds itself.

In stock

Kistler Pinot Noir

What — Pinot Noir
Where — Russian River Valley, USA
When — 2019

Dark red berry flavours with a gentle oak influence, held together with a long finish.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “Duck and Pinot might be very much the classic match, but Pinot and Popiah are a little different! It doesn’t lend itself to a leaner style of Pinot Noir, but needs something with a touch more opulence, from Russian River for instance, to balance the sweetness of the hoisin and garnishes.

Kistler’s been a long-time favourite of mine; I have been drinking their wines for over 15 years now—I was even on their mailing list for a number of years whilst living in Australia. They are icons of California and Sonoma, and have done well to evolve over time, while remaining true to their style and place. Not shy around a touch of opulence, yet without losing their ‘Pinosity’. I was lucky enough to visit back in 2013, and seeing things first-hand really cemented my love for what they’re doing.”

Kistler has long established itself for the quality production of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. With their reputation, it’s rare to find their wines in general retail, since their loyal mailing list hungrily takes the lion’s share of their total production. A combination of sites up and down the Sonoma Coast is used for this bottling; the wine is 100% de-stemmed and fermented in open-top fermenters, then treated softly with only the free-run juice collected from the tanks—no pressing. It spends around 10 months in barrel before being bottled, unfined and unfiltered.

Their style has eased back recently, compared to their earlier years which saw more extracted and richer styles. Now, with their combination of site selection and softer handling in the winery, their Pinot Noir has become emblematic of what is possible for pedigree, poise and distinction within the Sonoma Coast.

In stock

Clos Cibonne Cuvée Caroline Rosé

What — Rosé (Tibouren blend)
Where — Provence, France
When — 2020

An interwoven medley of cranberry, raspberry, orange zest, violets and a spicy accent of potpourri.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “The Cuvée Caroline from Clos Cibonne has a weightiness to it without being heavy or flabby, which can balance the richness of the duck and the sweetness of the hoisin sauce. I look at the Rosés from Clos Cibonne as something closer to a light red than a traditional Provence Rosé, which adds a great degree of versatility for pairings.

My first time trying Clos Cibonne would have been 6 to 7 years ago. I was at a friend’s restaurant in Hermitage, in the Rhone, who’s also a Master Sommelier. He brought a blind wine, which was such an eye-opening glass. I was blown away. I’ve since followed the wines and am super happy to see them in Singapore now.

While I really like Rosé, very much like my preference for sake, I am drawn towards things of interest, not quite just cookie-cutter Provence: things like Valentini’s Cerasuolo, Vina Tondonia’s truly unique Rosé, Arnot Roberts’ expression using Touriga Nacional—Clos Cibonne certainly fits within this ‘group’. Their use of a native variety like Tibouren, well-integrated oak and ageing potential all add to the special story that is this wine.”

Clos Cibonne has long championed the native Provençal variety Tibouren, and today it still remains at the heart of the estate, with a series of Rosé and red expressions focused around the variety. Ownership of the property dates back to 1797, when the Roux family purchased it from Jean Baptiste de Cibon, captain of the royal marines of Louis XVI. All the hard work has been fruitful—Clos Cibonne has since been promoted to one of the 18 Cru Classés in Côtes de Provence.

As one of Clos Cibonne’s prestige Rosé expressions, Cuvée Caroline is named after the daughter of Claude and Brigitte, who currently head the estate. It is sourced only from plots over 40 years old that are organically farmed and planted on calcareous clay and schist. Across these plots, it results in a blend of 85% Tibouren, 10% Grenache and 5% Syrah.

Its approach in the cellars is centred on its use of 300L French oak and regular battonage, with roughly one-third being new barrels—you’ll find that there aren’t too many Rosés with new oak used!

The resulting wine has a richness and complexity that is approachable and young, but also develops beautifully with time in the cellar. This is certainly not a Rosé for the faint-hearted, and it demonstrates the potential of the category at its extremes.

In stock

In stock

SKU: What Does A Master Sommelier Drink With Local Foods? (6-pack) Categories: ,
 

Description

Clink Clink has collaborated with Singapore-based Master Sommelier, Benjamin Hasko, and F&B Consultant, CR Tan, to produce a series of wine pairings with some of Singapore’s favourite local dishes. From a delectable duck popiah to savoury fried rice and meaty dumplings, this bundle is specially curated by Hasko to complement CR’s creations—recipe cards included with the bundle.

Mark Angeli La Lune Chenin Blanc

What — Chenin Blanc
Where — Loire Valley, France
When — 2020

Rich, textural expression with an array of bruised green apples, ripe stone fruits and an incredibly long and complex finish.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “This is a bit of a trickier dish to match. Having the elements of sweetness to balance in savoury dishes isn’t all too easy, but I find that wines with a touch of funk can work well—and La Lune works perfectly. It has a piercing acidity which helps cut through the oily character, and the inherent touch of cheesy funk from Chenin is a great complement to the oily, savoury nature of the dish. A little lick of residual sugar in the wine adds texture beyond just sweetness and balances the dish.

I’ve been a long-time fan of Mark Angeli; he is one of the godfathers of biodynamics and natural wine in the Loire. He’s known to push the limits and has done so despite the battle of less pedigreed vineyards seen with other top-flight producers. I really love Chenin Blanc—it’s such a chameleon of a variety. It has an amazing ability to adapt and be reflective of both place and winemaking, with a beautiful balance of flavour, funk, sugar and incredible ageing potential.”

A chemistry student turned stonemason, Mark Angeli fell in love with the world of wine and moved to Anjou, in the Loire Valley, in 1999. He stumbled upon La Ferme de la Sansonnière, a historic polycultural property, which was for sale and jumped at the opportunity—converting the property to biodynamic farming, which was quite revolutionary at the time. He faced severe opposition, including being refused AOC designations in the labelling of his wines. So in 2007, he stopped claiming any local appellations altogether and labelled them under Vin de France instead.

La Lune is 100% Chenin from different parcels within La Ferme de la Sansonnière, totalling around 3 hectares and making up roughly half of Angeli’s production. It’s made in a fairly dry style, but retains a balance of residual sugar against its vibrant acidity. The wine is fermented in old, large format barrels and spends 12 months ageing before bottling. As a testament to his work and continued drive, Angeli has converted the use of sulphur to volcanic sulphur—which isn’t a petrochemical byproduct. He believes that using this instead of conventional sulphur allows him to interfere less, while still achieving a stable wine.

A true benchmark for Chenin grown on schist, from a vigneron that has been responsible for the growth and development of so many within the Loire.

In stock

Vie de Romans Ciampagnis Vieris Chardonnay

What — Chardonnay
Where — Friuli, Italy
When — 2019

Textural richness balanced with fresh citrus notes, green apple tang, light notes of honey and a lingering acidity.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “I wanted to contrast the approach used with the La Lune Chenin (which was about the bit of funk and vibrant acidity) with a focus on textural richness and well-integrated oak. It provides a balance to the oily nature of the dish, with the oak elements lending a savoury edge to the wine.

This is really a polished, and age-worthy example of the style; it certainly sits amongst the top flight of Chardonnay globally. I’ve not visited the winery as of yet—but it’s certainly on my bucket list. I’ve been a long-time fan of their wines. I remember first experiencing their wines when working at Rockpool in Sydney, through their Pinot Grigio. At the time, I didn’t know it was a skin-contact style and when it poured, this amber colour was certainly a surprise for both me and the guest! Thankfully they loved the wine!”

Since its founding in 1900, Vie de Romans has remained in the hands of the Gallo family (different from the family behind American powerhouse, E&J Gallo), with Gianfranco Gallo leading the estate since 1978. Their work sees extensive time in the vines, with an astonishing 700 hours per hectare of vineyard work. They focus on wines of texture, tension and structure—with an array of wines produced in various styles.

Vie de Romans draws their Chardonnay from the vineyard, Ciampagnis Vieris, known for its shallow, well-drained soils with a gravel-pebbly texture and reddish clay hue. Following quite a traditional elevage, it sees approximately 8 months of barrel ageing on lees without malolactic, before further bottle time prior to release. While it is approachable and young, the wine has a long life ahead and really shines with aeration and time in a decanter, especially if it’s served early (and not too chilled).

 

In stock

Pauline Collin-Bérêche Ludes Vieilles Vignes

What — Champagne (100% Pinot Noir)
Where — Champagne, France
When — 2016

Rich and dark fruited with a brilliant acidity cutting through to a long finish.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “Two loves of mine—Champagne and dumplings! These dumplings are loaded with flavour, so they could use a richer style of Champagne to balance them with the acidity cutting through. The slight nutty touch of oxidative character you see with Pauline’s wine nicely counters the light sweetness in the dish.

I’ve been a long-time fan of Raphaël’s wines at Bérêche et Fils; you will always find a bottle or two of their Brut Reserve in my fridge. Her first release is a great way to start things off and it really over-delivers. Super exciting to see a new producer come to the front, with such pedigree and quality to match.”

Pauline Bérêche has taken over her family’s estate and is really beginning to bring it out of the shadows. Blessed with a suite of old vines in the village of Ludes, she has released the first wine under her eponymous label. Pauline has converted the vineyards to organic farming, allowing natural grasses to grow throughout. Her release is 100% Pinot Noir that has spent 48 months on lees before disgorgement and has a dosage of 3.5g/L. Just 1,996 bottles were produced for her 2016 vintage.

Pauline is the wife of Raphaël Bérêche (of Bérêche et Fils) and if her inaugural release is a sign of her potential, then she is going to be a worthy challenger to her husband in the future as a leading producer amongst the Montagne de Reims.

 

In stock

Mukai Shuzō Natsu No Omoide

What — Sake (100% Gohyakumangoku)
Where — Kyōto, Japan
When — 2000

Amazing freshness for its age, with a balanced touch of sweetness through a complexity of flavours and bright acidity.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “Personally, I love sake. I find myself drawn towards the ‘weird and wacky’, where flavour and some funk is central—the antithesis to the purity that most associate with sake. The dish has a nutty character, some sweetness and a savoury finish: very much complementary flavours to aged sake, particularly the Natsu No Omoide which was brewed in 2000 with a yeast strain that’s 1,000 years old. The sake has a touch of sweetness, with a refreshing acidity. This really pushes the boundaries on most people’s definition of sake. It’s a great conduit between natural wine lovers and the world of sake.

It’s not everyday that you see a 20-year-old sake. I’m a huge fan of the producer, who is one of the first female Master Brewers in Japan—when she was just in her early 20s! Their sakes are very much about complexity, balance and versatility. Not many sake can be two decades old and still going as strong, fresh and vibrant as this.”

Mukai Shuzō is an ancient brewery that has maintained its familial tradition and practice since 1754. The owner’s eldest daughter, Kuniko Mukai, became one of the first female Master Brewers in Japan at 22, and her ascension to Toji marks nearly 275 years of continual family lineage.

Production remains small, with a constant drive to challenge and improve things. Kuniko’s quest for quality has led to a demand amongst sake aficionados that far outweighs production.

Natsu no Omoide (meaning ‘Memories of Summer’) was brewed for the turn of the millennium and is one of Kuniko’s first brews as head brewer. It uses Gohyakumangoku rice polished to 70% and a unique 100-year-old yeast strain. Most sake would be well and truly dead at 20 years of age, but this one demonstrates a complex blend of nutty, woody, floral and a strong backbone of acidity. Truly, one to sip and savour as it unfolds itself.

In stock

Kistler Pinot Noir

What — Pinot Noir
Where — Russian River Valley, USA
When — 2019

Dark red berry flavours with a gentle oak influence, held together with a long finish.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “Duck and Pinot might be very much the classic match, but Pinot and Popiah are a little different! It doesn’t lend itself to a leaner style of Pinot Noir, but needs something with a touch more opulence, from Russian River for instance, to balance the sweetness of the hoisin and garnishes.

Kistler’s been a long-time favourite of mine; I have been drinking their wines for over 15 years now—I was even on their mailing list for a number of years whilst living in Australia. They are icons of California and Sonoma, and have done well to evolve over time, while remaining true to their style and place. Not shy around a touch of opulence, yet without losing their ‘Pinosity’. I was lucky enough to visit back in 2013, and seeing things first-hand really cemented my love for what they’re doing.”

Kistler has long established itself for the quality production of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. With their reputation, it’s rare to find their wines in general retail, since their loyal mailing list hungrily takes the lion’s share of their total production. A combination of sites up and down the Sonoma Coast is used for this bottling; the wine is 100% de-stemmed and fermented in open-top fermenters, then treated softly with only the free-run juice collected from the tanks—no pressing. It spends around 10 months in barrel before being bottled, unfined and unfiltered.

Their style has eased back recently, compared to their earlier years which saw more extracted and richer styles. Now, with their combination of site selection and softer handling in the winery, their Pinot Noir has become emblematic of what is possible for pedigree, poise and distinction within the Sonoma Coast.

In stock

Clos Cibonne Cuvée Caroline Rosé

What — Rosé (Tibouren blend)
Where — Provence, France
When — 2020

An interwoven medley of cranberry, raspberry, orange zest, violets and a spicy accent of potpourri.

+ Read More

Hasko says: “The Cuvée Caroline from Clos Cibonne has a weightiness to it without being heavy or flabby, which can balance the richness of the duck and the sweetness of the hoisin sauce. I look at the Rosés from Clos Cibonne as something closer to a light red than a traditional Provence Rosé, which adds a great degree of versatility for pairings.

My first time trying Clos Cibonne would have been 6 to 7 years ago. I was at a friend’s restaurant in Hermitage, in the Rhone, who’s also a Master Sommelier. He brought a blind wine, which was such an eye-opening glass. I was blown away. I’ve since followed the wines and am super happy to see them in Singapore now.

While I really like Rosé, very much like my preference for sake, I am drawn towards things of interest, not quite just cookie-cutter Provence: things like Valentini’s Cerasuolo, Vina Tondonia’s truly unique Rosé, Arnot Roberts’ expression using Touriga Nacional—Clos Cibonne certainly fits within this ‘group’. Their use of a native variety like Tibouren, well-integrated oak and ageing potential all add to the special story that is this wine.”

Clos Cibonne has long championed the native Provençal variety Tibouren, and today it still remains at the heart of the estate, with a series of Rosé and red expressions focused around the variety. Ownership of the property dates back to 1797, when the Roux family purchased it from Jean Baptiste de Cibon, captain of the royal marines of Louis XVI. All the hard work has been fruitful—Clos Cibonne has since been promoted to one of the 18 Cru Classés in Côtes de Provence.

As one of Clos Cibonne’s prestige Rosé expressions, Cuvée Caroline is named after the daughter of Claude and Brigitte, who currently head the estate. It is sourced only from plots over 40 years old that are organically farmed and planted on calcareous clay and schist. Across these plots, it results in a blend of 85% Tibouren, 10% Grenache and 5% Syrah.

Its approach in the cellars is centred on its use of 300L French oak and regular battonage, with roughly one-third being new barrels—you’ll find that there aren’t too many Rosés with new oak used!

The resulting wine has a richness and complexity that is approachable and young, but also develops beautifully with time in the cellar. This is certainly not a Rosé for the faint-hearted, and it demonstrates the potential of the category at its extremes.

In stock

In stock