Joshua Kalinan’s Bundle

$395.00 excl. GST

Master Sake Sommelier Joshua Kalinan curates artisanal sakes from lesser-known sake breweries that are quietly shaking up the sake industry. Discover an artisanal range of six quality-driven sakes representative of the various styles and regions.

Within this bundle:

  • Suigei Tokubetsu Junmai
  • Suigei Junmai Hattan Nishiki
  • Daimon 45
  • Shinshu Meijo Takizawa Junmai Daiginjo
  • Hatsumago Kimoto Junmai
  • Hatsumago Dewanosato Junmai

Suigei Tokubetsu Junmai

Who — Suigei
What — Akitsuho
Where — Kochi, Japan
Style — Tokubetsu Junmai
Polishing Ratio — 55%
S.M.V. — +6.6
Vol — 720ml

Strong presence of fennel and hops and is underscored by an unripe strawberry vein, over a very clean & delicate texture.

+ Read More

Josh says: “Sake from Kochi is really a hidden gem; it’s not a region that people speak about. It’s a region that’s been largely focused upon yeast research; they’ve even sent yeast into space to see what it does! 

The sake of Suigei is emblematic of the region, in my view. They’re light & fresh with great versatility. I’ve always got a bottle in my fridge, as they work equally as well as an aperitif as they do when matched with light bites”

Suigei, which means ‘drunken whale’, is named after a warlord in Kochi Prefecture in the Edo period who loved eating and drinking. The love for food & beverage remains central to Sugiei’s approach to making sake, as a food-friendly approach is key to their style of sake production. 

Tokubetsu, meaning special, refers to a higher than required milling rate of the rice having been applied to, in this instance, the junmai classification.

In stock

Suigei Junmai Hattan Nishiki

Who — Suigei 
What —  Hattan Nishiki
Where — Kochi, Japan
Style — Junmai
Polishing Ratio — 60%
S.M.V. — +6.5
Vol — 720ml

Clean & crisp example, that remains light on the palate with both texture and flavour without lacking expression.

+ Read More

Josh says: “This sake for me is my perfect lazy Sunday afternoon sake. I’ve had more than a couple of bottles of this with my partner and a few grazing style bites over some long afternoons. It’s a very dry style of sake, with firm acidity. Both are aspects that make it incredibly food-friendly, and it loves seafood in various guises. 

For the best results, take it nice and slowly over a long session watching it unfold and develop. It’s best drunk out of a wine glass, and not too cold for its best expression.”

Suigei, which means ‘drunken whale’, is named after a warlord in Kochi Prefecture in the Edo period who loved eating and drinking. The love for food & beverage remains central to Sugiei’s approach to making sake, as a food-friendly approach is key to their style of sake production. 

Hattan Nishiki tends to create medium-bodied, earthy and softly textured sakes. It can often be associated with lower-grade sake, however the quality level of Suigei dismays any notion of inferiority. 

In stock

Daimon 45

Who — Daimon
What — Hyogo Yamada Nishiki
Where — Osaka, Japan
Style — Junmai Daiginjo
Polishing Ratio — 45%
S.M.V. — +3.0
Vol — 720ml

A refreshing and dry sake that shows strength and character on the palate and opens up to a light malt and cocoa bean note, with subtle spices on the nose. An elegant texture through the palate with a lively acidic finish.

+ Read More

Josh says: “This sake has a lot of meaning for me. In 2019, I was invited to visit personally by Daimon-san. It’s a beautiful brewery that I fell in love with. Their style is focused on lots of umami for the sake. Osaka is such a culinary capital, and you can see how they make their sake to accompany food. The sake is really one to watch unfurl in the glass; it develops beautifully around an hour after opening.”

Daimon, founded in 1826, is located at the foot of the scenic Ikoma mountain range in Katano City, near Osaka. Sake production began during the Edo period, but of the many sake-producing firms originally present, only Daimon Shuzo and one other remain. It remains owned by the sixth generation of the same family today.

Quality has always been the key tenet to Daimon Shuzo. Their annual production is around 500 koku (a traditional measurement of sake, being 180 litres). They are known for long fermentations at low temperatures, which provide greater consistency to the products. The fastidious nature of their production is exemplified with batches of rice being prepared in 10kg lots. Daimon firmly believes that the extra time given to their production remains key to the consistency: “while the West brews its beer based on recipes we brew our Sake based on time.”

In stock

Takizawa Junmai Daiginjo

Who — Shinshu Meijo
What — Hitogokoti
Where — Osaka, Japan
Style — Junmai Daiginjo
Polishing Ratio — 49%
S.M.V. — -1.0
Vol — 720ml

Flavours of red berries, cereals & white over a subtle sweetness balanced with bright acidity.

+ Read More

Josh says: “The rice grown here is at very, very low temperatures. They’re grown in the mountainous areas of Nagano, with very soft waters resulting in a delicate style of sake. 

The best examples of Hitogokoti-rice sakes are from the Nagano prefecture, and Takizawa’s Junmai Daiginjo for me is a great example of the modern styles you can see.”

 Shinshu Meijo created their Takizawa range of sake with the modern Japanese palate in mind. It was brewed as a celebration of the Nagano region, utilising top-grade Hitogokoti rice grown to their specifications and a specific water source drawn from an underground mountain stream. By working closely with the local rice farmers, they have been able to increase the viability for many in the region, with increased margins on the rice sales whilst still being able to maintain a cost-effective sake. 

The brewery is known for a highly aromatic style, with a fuller body and high acidity.

In stock

Hatsumago Kimoto Junmai

Who — Hatsumago
What — Miyama Nishiki
Where — Yamagata, Japan
Style — Junmai (Kimoto)
Polishing Ratio — 60%
S.M.V. — +3.0
Vol — 720ml

A restrained nose leading to flavours of raspberries & cinnamon on the palate over a dry finish.

+ Read More

Josh says: “Only about 10% of the industry produce Kimoto sakes. The mastery that Hatsumago have result in lots of creaminess, from the lactic acid in the process, without being too much. They pulverise the rice, releasing the lactic acid, meaning that there’s no need for any to be added. 

There’s certainly an exploration of styles we’re seeing with sake drinkers, with movement from lighter styles to something richer. More people are exploring Yamahai and Kimoto sakes.” 

When the brewery was founded in 1893, it was originally called Kinkyu. The name ‘Hatsumago’ (translated as the first grandchild) was adopted in the 1930s following the birth of the family’s first grandchild. 

Hatsumago is recognised as a specialist in the use of the Kimoto brewing method, a traditional method where lactic bacteria are attracted to the fermenting mash. It results in sake which has additional depth, richness and acidity. It takes great skill to produce stable sake of high quality this way, and it took decades for Hatsumago to master it to perfection. These efforts have paid off with multiple awards including “Sake Brewer of the Year” 2018 by the International Wine Challenge.

In stock

Hatsumago Dewanosato Junmai

Who — Hatsumago
What — Dewanosato
Where — Yamagata, Japan
Style — Junmai
Polishing Ratio — 55%
S.M.V. — +/- 0
Vol — 720ml

Fresh pear notes with cereal aromas with a gentle palate showing a good balance of dryness countered with a delicate sweet touch through to a long, clean finish.

+ Read More

Josh says: “The rice variety of Dewanosato is quite an interesting one. It links back to the region of Yamagata, with the Yamagata originally being part of the ancient Dewa province. Dewanosato has since become the synonymous sakamai of Yamagata. Hatsumago’s traditional approach of kimoto production results in a fantastic representation of historic Yamagata sake production”. 

When the brewery was founded in 1893, it was originally called Kinkyu. The name ‘Hatsumago’ (translated as the first grandchild) was adopted in the 1930s following the birth of the family’s first grandchild. 

Hatsumago is recognised as a specialist in the use of the Kimoto brewing method., a traditional method where lactic bacteria are attracted to the fermenting mash. It results in sake which have additional depth, richness and acidity.

Dewanosato is Yamagata’s original rice which had been produced with the aim of becoming the best quality Junmai Sakamai. It still remains the key rice variety in sake production for the Yamagata region.

In stock

In stock

SKU: Joshua Kalinan's Bundle (6 Pack) Categories: ,
 

Description

Uncork Master Sake Sommelier Joshua Kalinan’s Bundle. In his selection, Joshua expresses his deep respect for lesser-known sake breweries that are quietly shaking up the sake industry. Learn about his love for sake through a curation that pairs harmoniously with local food favourites and international cuisine alike.

 

 

Additional information

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Suigei Tokubetsu Junmai

Who — Suigei
What — Akitsuho
Where — Kochi, Japan
Style — Tokubetsu Junmai
Polishing Ratio — 55%
S.M.V. — +6.6
Vol — 720ml

Strong presence of fennel and hops and is underscored by an unripe strawberry vein, over a very clean & delicate texture.

+ Read More

Josh says: “Sake from Kochi is really a hidden gem; it’s not a region that people speak about. It’s a region that’s been largely focused upon yeast research; they’ve even sent yeast into space to see what it does! 

The sake of Suigei is emblematic of the region, in my view. They’re light & fresh with great versatility. I’ve always got a bottle in my fridge, as they work equally as well as an aperitif as they do when matched with light bites”

Suigei, which means ‘drunken whale’, is named after a warlord in Kochi Prefecture in the Edo period who loved eating and drinking. The love for food & beverage remains central to Sugiei’s approach to making sake, as a food-friendly approach is key to their style of sake production. 

Tokubetsu, meaning special, refers to a higher than required milling rate of the rice having been applied to, in this instance, the junmai classification.

In stock

Suigei Junmai Hattan Nishiki

Who — Suigei 
What —  Hattan Nishiki
Where — Kochi, Japan
Style — Junmai
Polishing Ratio — 60%
S.M.V. — +6.5
Vol — 720ml

Clean & crisp example, that remains light on the palate with both texture and flavour without lacking expression.

+ Read More

Josh says: “This sake for me is my perfect lazy Sunday afternoon sake. I’ve had more than a couple of bottles of this with my partner and a few grazing style bites over some long afternoons. It’s a very dry style of sake, with firm acidity. Both are aspects that make it incredibly food-friendly, and it loves seafood in various guises. 

For the best results, take it nice and slowly over a long session watching it unfold and develop. It’s best drunk out of a wine glass, and not too cold for its best expression.”

Suigei, which means ‘drunken whale’, is named after a warlord in Kochi Prefecture in the Edo period who loved eating and drinking. The love for food & beverage remains central to Sugiei’s approach to making sake, as a food-friendly approach is key to their style of sake production. 

Hattan Nishiki tends to create medium-bodied, earthy and softly textured sakes. It can often be associated with lower-grade sake, however the quality level of Suigei dismays any notion of inferiority. 

In stock

Daimon 45

Who — Daimon
What — Hyogo Yamada Nishiki
Where — Osaka, Japan
Style — Junmai Daiginjo
Polishing Ratio — 45%
S.M.V. — +3.0
Vol — 720ml

A refreshing and dry sake that shows strength and character on the palate and opens up to a light malt and cocoa bean note, with subtle spices on the nose. An elegant texture through the palate with a lively acidic finish.

+ Read More

Josh says: “This sake has a lot of meaning for me. In 2019, I was invited to visit personally by Daimon-san. It’s a beautiful brewery that I fell in love with. Their style is focused on lots of umami for the sake. Osaka is such a culinary capital, and you can see how they make their sake to accompany food. The sake is really one to watch unfurl in the glass; it develops beautifully around an hour after opening.”

Daimon, founded in 1826, is located at the foot of the scenic Ikoma mountain range in Katano City, near Osaka. Sake production began during the Edo period, but of the many sake-producing firms originally present, only Daimon Shuzo and one other remain. It remains owned by the sixth generation of the same family today.

Quality has always been the key tenet to Daimon Shuzo. Their annual production is around 500 koku (a traditional measurement of sake, being 180 litres). They are known for long fermentations at low temperatures, which provide greater consistency to the products. The fastidious nature of their production is exemplified with batches of rice being prepared in 10kg lots. Daimon firmly believes that the extra time given to their production remains key to the consistency: “while the West brews its beer based on recipes we brew our Sake based on time.”

In stock

Takizawa Junmai Daiginjo

Who — Shinshu Meijo
What — Hitogokoti
Where — Osaka, Japan
Style — Junmai Daiginjo
Polishing Ratio — 49%
S.M.V. — -1.0
Vol — 720ml

Flavours of red berries, cereals & white over a subtle sweetness balanced with bright acidity.

+ Read More

Josh says: “The rice grown here is at very, very low temperatures. They’re grown in the mountainous areas of Nagano, with very soft waters resulting in a delicate style of sake. 

The best examples of Hitogokoti-rice sakes are from the Nagano prefecture, and Takizawa’s Junmai Daiginjo for me is a great example of the modern styles you can see.”

 Shinshu Meijo created their Takizawa range of sake with the modern Japanese palate in mind. It was brewed as a celebration of the Nagano region, utilising top-grade Hitogokoti rice grown to their specifications and a specific water source drawn from an underground mountain stream. By working closely with the local rice farmers, they have been able to increase the viability for many in the region, with increased margins on the rice sales whilst still being able to maintain a cost-effective sake. 

The brewery is known for a highly aromatic style, with a fuller body and high acidity.

In stock

Hatsumago Kimoto Junmai

Who — Hatsumago
What — Miyama Nishiki
Where — Yamagata, Japan
Style — Junmai (Kimoto)
Polishing Ratio — 60%
S.M.V. — +3.0
Vol — 720ml

A restrained nose leading to flavours of raspberries & cinnamon on the palate over a dry finish.

+ Read More

Josh says: “Only about 10% of the industry produce Kimoto sakes. The mastery that Hatsumago have result in lots of creaminess, from the lactic acid in the process, without being too much. They pulverise the rice, releasing the lactic acid, meaning that there’s no need for any to be added. 

There’s certainly an exploration of styles we’re seeing with sake drinkers, with movement from lighter styles to something richer. More people are exploring Yamahai and Kimoto sakes.” 

When the brewery was founded in 1893, it was originally called Kinkyu. The name ‘Hatsumago’ (translated as the first grandchild) was adopted in the 1930s following the birth of the family’s first grandchild. 

Hatsumago is recognised as a specialist in the use of the Kimoto brewing method, a traditional method where lactic bacteria are attracted to the fermenting mash. It results in sake which has additional depth, richness and acidity. It takes great skill to produce stable sake of high quality this way, and it took decades for Hatsumago to master it to perfection. These efforts have paid off with multiple awards including “Sake Brewer of the Year” 2018 by the International Wine Challenge.

In stock

Hatsumago Dewanosato Junmai

Who — Hatsumago
What — Dewanosato
Where — Yamagata, Japan
Style — Junmai
Polishing Ratio — 55%
S.M.V. — +/- 0
Vol — 720ml

Fresh pear notes with cereal aromas with a gentle palate showing a good balance of dryness countered with a delicate sweet touch through to a long, clean finish.

+ Read More

Josh says: “The rice variety of Dewanosato is quite an interesting one. It links back to the region of Yamagata, with the Yamagata originally being part of the ancient Dewa province. Dewanosato has since become the synonymous sakamai of Yamagata. Hatsumago’s traditional approach of kimoto production results in a fantastic representation of historic Yamagata sake production”. 

When the brewery was founded in 1893, it was originally called Kinkyu. The name ‘Hatsumago’ (translated as the first grandchild) was adopted in the 1930s following the birth of the family’s first grandchild. 

Hatsumago is recognised as a specialist in the use of the Kimoto brewing method., a traditional method where lactic bacteria are attracted to the fermenting mash. It results in sake which have additional depth, richness and acidity.

Dewanosato is Yamagata’s original rice which had been produced with the aim of becoming the best quality Junmai Sakamai. It still remains the key rice variety in sake production for the Yamagata region.

In stock

In stock